Day Ten: Random Lists – 5,4,3,2,1

Learn this, Know this, and LIVE this. You know who you are. Start counting your own blessings instead of (making me feel guilty for) mine.

5 Random Facts about me:

1) My biological father and his family traveled to the U.S. from Cuba to escape Fidel Castro. My last name is no longer Villanueva, and my parents didn’t stay married for long, so it always surprises people that I am Hispanic. Plus, my stepdad is from Pittsburgh, and people always see a resemblance between the two of us.

2) I used to travel to Southwest Harbor, Maine in the summers to visit my aunt and uncle. The smell of evergreen and blueberry bushes bring back great memories for me.

3) I have lived in Greenville, South Carolina – Dothan, Alabama – and Houston, Texas. I am back home in Georgia now.

4) I learned to water ski when I was 40. Probably the biggest “fear” I have overcome.

5) My husband has completed 3 Ironman Triathlons: one in Panama City Beach, FL, another in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and the third in Madison, Wisconsin.

4 Bucket List Items. I would like to do the following:

1) hike part of the Appalachian trail

2) travel in Europe

3) take an Alaskan cruise

4) be a published author

3 Things I hope for this year:

1) to be more organized at school (which results in wasted time)

2) to balance my time more efficiently

3) to be kind to my students (even when I am frazzled)

2 Things that have made me laugh or cry as a teacher:

1) The last day that our seniors attend school in May is a bittersweet day for me and always leaves me in tears.

2) Last year an AP Chemistry student (who is dear to me) answered an FRQ (Free response question), and in her answer she made an analogy between chemical kinetics and teen pregnancy. She made the statement that the molecules in chemical reactions are like high schoolers with raging hormones. They just can’t wait, and just like the chemical reaction takes place, teen pregnancy results. I couldn’t figure out if she got the answer right or not, because the rubric failed me at that point. We all laughed really hard at this, and I am sure that I saved her paper.

1 thing I wish that more people knew about me….

I am working on writing a young adult novel about a group of teens who have unique challenges and secrets but work together to solve a series of crimes using their STEM skills. It is still awkward for me to discuss because it is such a new adventure. Kind of like when you get married and you find yourself talking about your “husband” when it is still such a new part of life. The best part of this work is that it’s so intertwined with everything I love to do: hang out with teenagers and talk about STEM. (Plus it’s on my bucket list!)

Day Eight: My Desk Drawer – my battle with purple pens & how I plan to win the war with the pen!

What’s in my desk drawer? Lots of pens, pencils, highlighters, erasers & whiteout. I use purple Bic pens for grading, and there is always an unbalanced distribution of those pens in my life. I keep the purple pens in one of these places: my car, my kitchen, my purse, my briefcase, behind my ear, and in my desk drawer at school.  Today I reached into my purse and found four purple pens. I don’t need four purple pens in my purse. I have to redistribute them tomorrow. Mondays are always busy, and the redistribution of pens isn’t important enough to make it to my “to do” list, but if I don’t do it, I will feel scattered. That is an example of why Mondays are “Mondays”. Reorganizing the little things requires time and distracts from the higher priority issues.

Tomorrow I am going to start using socrative.com and I am really looking forward to it. It is an online quizzing tool for my students that will require less usage of pens. Chalkup.co is another tool I plan to implement this week – designed for fewer pens and more online grading. I will report later on how those are working for me. Thanks to my colleague Matt East for introducing these to me. He works on the other side of campus, but we communicate often through Twitter, my favorite social media tool.

One quick note: I am slowing down on my blogging. I plan to continue my 30 day challenge, but it will take me longer than 30 days to write 30 posts. Yes – I am differentiating from many of you by going at a slower pace than I originally anticipated. I have gotten behind on grading, planning, and family time. I love the reflection, but I have to do some actual/real work so that I can find material to reflect on! Thanks to those of you who are reading, and Blog Day 9 will be coming one day soon….

Day Four: The TWO Things I Love Most About Teaching

I LOVE teaching. There are specifically 2 reasons that I enjoy my job.

1) STEM Career Coaching

My grandmother used to talk to her grown children frequently about their jobs. Of course she was concerned about family, kids, home, but career has always been important to my family. It’s genetic. You spend SO much time working. Not just the everyday, but across your entire life. It is important to have a fulfilling, enjoyable career because it is a huge part of life.

Many of our students don’t have someone who know much about the STEM in their careers, so I enjoy helping my students think about their options. Careers that require STEM include: doctor, electrician, cosmetologist, radiology assistant, auto mechanic, farmer, graphic designer, photographer, engineer, chef, builder, athletic trainer,…. You get the idea. Everyone uses STEM!

The students who take the hard core STEM jobs …I teach them in AP Chemistry, coach them in science Olympiad, or guide them to become a STEM intern with a local business. If they can narrow their focus in high school, they can get a head start on where to concentrate when they get to college.

2) I love high school kids. I can have regular conversations with them like I would with other adults, BUT high school kids like to have a bit more fun than adults do. And so do I. I like goofing off and being silly, and that works well in the classroom. I just read a great blog post by Heather Hollands and Amy Latinen, and Heather mentioned wanting to “engage all students” this year as one of her goals. Goofing off (in the right context) while teaching chemistry is my way of engaging students. They tend to stay focused a bit more because they don’t want to miss anything.

There is definitely more that I love about teaching, but this will be enough for now…..

@marthavmilam

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Day Three: Teacher Evaluation Goal – Including Differentiation in My Lesson Plans (& why I DON’T want to do it!)

I will have to say that the part of our TKES (Teacher Keys Effectiveness System) in which I am weakest is DIFFERENTIATION. I don’t PLAN it into my lesson plans like I need to do for the teacher evaluation process.

After reading a little bit on the subject, it seems that there are three terms: Differentiation, Personalized Learning, and Individualization of Learning. I personally don’t have an interest in spending much time “differentiating” among these three, but I will discuss them because it is an interesting concept. “Personalization” is not something that teachers can provide – it’s what those of us who are reading this blog are doing: directing our own learning. I do encourage students to do such, however.

I realize that I am a long way from documentation of individualized learning. I work about ten hours a day, I never get my daily goals completely accomplished, and I don’t do a good job of differentiating in my lesson plans. That being said, individualization is not on my radar as a “planned” goal. I already give up here.

Now – do I DO individualized learning with students? Of course! Most teachers do….We see how or why a student is struggling OR why he/she is so far advanced, and we create an explanation or a question specifically for that student. That is individualized teaching (learning?-doesn’t matter what you call it in my opinion). Am I going to spend time to put that in my lesson plans? No.

Do I differentiate? Of course – same as above. Most teachers do. Is it important to put that in my lesson plans? Not in my opinion, but that’s because I know I am doing it – so documenting becomes is a burdensome task. I suppose that with 150 teachers at our school it needs to be documented somewhere in case someone might possibly want to see it. Although I hope that I do the right things most days, I know that others may be falling short and that documentation should be required.

It’s only my third blog, but it’s already time for me to reveal that I am not a fan of educational drama. I know that those outside the classroom love to research the latest and greatest things that those of us in the classroom should be doing, but to me good teaching is just a combination of “teacher sense”, professionalism, loving kids, content knowledge…and enough sleep.

Back to the goal. I WILL include differentiation in my lesson plans – and the best part of this is that I work with a great team of peers and a supportive administration. We will work together to accomplish this task so that I can get a check mark on my teacher evaluation. And so that I can go to sleep at night.

@marthavmilam

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Day Two: My Technology Goal for the Year – Designed for Cross-Curricular Learning

One of our school STEM goals for the year is to create and implement cross-curricular (integrated) lessons. I am hoping to partner my AP chemistry students with students in both AP Literature and AP Microeconomics. In order to connect students with classes that do not meet at the same time we will use a web tool like Canvas Infrastructure. This platform allows teachers to assign lessons and allows students to communicate with one another and with their three teachers (yikes!). Canvas Infrastructure provides a user-friendly forum for cross-curricular projects and learning.

Read Ben Johnson’s blog featured on edutopia.org for inspiration and guidelines on how to plan with a cross-curricular team. Also see a video produced by Ken Ellis on the topic of Integrated Studies.

@marthavmilam

The philosophy of the school room in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next. —Abraham Lincoln

Whenever you're feeling like giving up, remember these words.

 

The 30 Day Blog of a High School Science Teacher

I am taking the challenge. Not the ice bucket challenge, but the blogging challenge. Apparently September is Reflective Teacher Month at TeachThought, an innovative teaching organization that inspires me via a Twitter feed. I would like to blog as a science teacher, but I don’t have a clear direction on creating material. Thank you to @teachthought for posting 30 days worth of blogging ideas. I am ready to start! Stay tuned for Monday, September 1…. #reflectiveteacher

@marthavmilam

wpid-wp-1409361558351.jpeg“We are our stories. We compress years of experience, thought, and emotion into a few compact narratives that we convey to others and tell ourselves…”—Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind
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